October 2013

PCAPS to call for city property tax abatements to be used to fund schools, hold Halloween-themed march

Media Advisory

For Immediate Release

Tuesday, October 29, 2013

Jihad Seifullah

614-390-1105, pcapscoordinator@gmail.com

Jesse Kudler

617-974-3684, jesse@fightforphilly.org

PCAPS to call for city property tax abatements to be used to fund schools, hold Halloween-themed march

Philadelphia Coalition Advocating for Public Schools event will call for end of property tax gifts to wealthy developers and issue new paper showing how funds could help city schools

Philadelphia, PA – On Tuesday, the Philadelphia Coalition Advocating for Public Schools will hold a press conference and Halloween-themed “Monster March for Full Funding.”  The coalition will release a new white paper, “Short-changing Philadelphia Students: How the 10-Year Tax Abatement Underwrites Luxury Developments and Starves Schools” and call for redirecting city funds from property tax abatements to city schools.

Philadelphia’s property tax abatement is widely considered to be the most generous in the nation.  Wasteful tax giveaways to wealthy developers benefit a small group of people in a few neighborhoods at the expense of public school students across the city, creating a nightmare.  Tax abatements are scary!  Just 20 buildings in Philadelphia account for almost $15 million in lost tax revenue that would otherwise go towards schools in 2014.   Overall, property tax abatements are expected to cost the school district $50 million next year.

Activists will rally at some of the most valuable buildings in the city that benefit from property tax abatements.  10 Rittenhouse Square is worth nearly $150 million, but its abatement costs the school district over $1 million annually.  Comcast CEO Brian Roberts owns a unit at 10 Rittenhouse.  Comcast Center’s abatement will cost the school district $1.5 million in 2014. 

PCAPS will introduce the paper and their campaign to end abatements that cost the school district money.  A public school parent, teacher, and student will speak about shortcomings in city schools that could be alleviated with additional funds from ending tax abatements.  A member of the Philadelphia Chapter of Resource Generation will also speak in support of ending abatements.  Resource Generation organizes young people with financial wealth to leverage resources and privilege for social change. 

Following the press conference, activists in costumes representing corporate greed will Monster March to large buildings that benefit from abatements at the expense of schools.  They will deliver a “Trick or Treat” message in the lobbies of Rittenhouse Square properties and leaflet passersby with information on the cost to schools of abatements.

WHO:

Philadelphia Coalition Advocating for Public Schools (PCAPS), parents , teachers, students, member of Resource Generation

WHAT:

Press conference to call for city tax abatements to be spent on Philadelphia education, release of paper showing how money could be better spent, Halloween-themed “Monster March” against abatements

WHEN:

Tuesday, October 29, 4:30pm

WHERE:

10 Rittenhouse Square, 130 South 18th Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19103

VISUAL:

Costumed activists, parents, teachers, students, white paper, Halloween decorations

 ###

PCAPS is a coalition of students, parents, and teachers with an unwavering commitment to improving Philadelphia’s school system. Members of the coalition include ACTION United, American Federation of Teachers PA, AFL-CIO Central Labor Council Fight For Philly, Jewish Labor Committee, Jobs With Justice, JUNTOS, Media Mobilizing Project, Neighborhood Networks, Occupy Philadelphia Labor Work Group, Philadelphians Allied for a Responsible Economy(PHARE), Philadelphia Federation of Teachers, Philadelphia Home and School Council, Philadelphia Student Union, SEIU 32BJ, UNITE HERE, Youth United for Change.

http://www.wearepcaps.org

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Seventh PCAPS Full Funding Fridays events this morning

Media Advisory

For Immediate Release

Friday, October 25, 2013

Jihad Seifullah

614-390-1105, pcapscoordinator@gmail.com

Jesse Kudler

617-974-3684, jesse@fightforphilly.org

 

 

 

Seventh PCAPS Full Funding Fridays events this morning

Philadelphia Coalition Advocating for Public Schools continues to expand Friday events with rallies at eight schools to keep up pressure for proper funding for education

Philadelphia, PA – Friday morning, the Philadelphia Coalition Advocating for Public Schools (PCAPS) will hold its seventh week of Full Funding Fridays campaign events, rallying at eight city schools. Parents and activists will join school staff to rally, hand out signs and pins, and speak about the need for more funding for Philadelphia public schools.  At Cook-Wissahickon Elementary School, Philadelphia Federation of Teachers President Jerry Jordan will join an active parent group from the school.  Cook-Wissahickon is losing 2 teachers and facing a split grade class as a consequence of leveling.

Ralliers will also have complaint forms for parents to fill out about problematic school conditions and flyers to contact elected officials with complaints.  Despite Governor Corbett finally releasing $45 million in federal funds he had cruelly kept from Philadelphia education, city schools are still suffering from massive shortfalls.  The 400 staff that will be rehired represent only a fraction of those laid off under the School Reform Commission’s “doomsday budget,” and no nurses will be rehired, even after the tragic and much-publicized death of student Laporshia Massey.

Laura H. Carnell Elementary has only one Spanish-speaker on site only two days a week.  There is one counselor and one secretary for 1,200 students. Teachers at Blankenburg Elementary are paying out of pocket for supplies. There is no full-time counselor and a nurse is only on site two days a week. There are no hallway aides or classroom assistants for kindergarten classes.   George Washington Carver High School of Engineering and Sciences has only one counselor for more than 800 students, and their library is closed during school hours.  Pennypacker Elementary lacks basic supplies like books and paper. The school does not have a full-time counselor. The school dean and community liaison were cut.  Conwell Middle Magnet School has no classroom assistants and no full-time counselor.  J. Hampton Moore Elementary School has no classroom assistants and no full-time counselor.  Morton Elementary School has lost several of its support staff, as well as an assistant principal and librarian. The school also lacks basic supplies like books and paper, and their school library is now closed.

WHO:

Philadelphia Coalition Advocating for Public Schools (PCAPS), parents, school staff, PFT President Jerry Jordan

WHAT:

Full Funding Fridays Actions, week seven

WHEN:

Friday, October 25, 2013, 8;15 am, and 7:15 and 7:45am

WHERE:

Cook-Wissahickon, 201 E Salaignac St  Philadelphia, PA 19128, 8:15am (primary location for press)

Blankenberg Elementary, 4600 W Girard Ave, Philadelphia PA 19131, 7:45am

Carnell Elementary, 1100 Devereaux Ave, Philadelphia PA 19111, 7:45am

Carver High School, 1600 W. Norris Street, Philadelphia PA 1912, 7:15am

Conwell Middle, 1849 E. Clearfield Street, Philadelphia PA 19134, 7:25am

J. Hampton Moore Elementary, 6900 Summerdale  Ave, Philadelphia PA 19111, 7:45am

Morton Elementary, 2501 S 63rd Street Philadelphia, PA 19142, 7:45am

Pennypacker Elementary, 1858 E Washington Lane Philadelphia PA 19138, 7:45am

VISUAL:

Speakers, pins, signs, complaint forms, ralliers, parents

###

PCAPS is a coalition of students, parents, and teachers with an unwavering commitment to improving Philadelphia’s school system. Members of the coalition include ACTION United, American Federation of Teachers PA, AFL-CIO Central Labor Council Fight For Philly, Jewish Labor Committee, Jobs With Justice, JUNTOS, Media Mobilizing Project, Neighborhood Networks, Occupy Philadelphia Labor Work Group, Philadelphians Allied for a Responsible Economy(PHARE), Philadelphia Federation of Teachers, Philadelphia Home and School Council, Philadelphia Student Union, SEIU 32BJ, UNITE HERE, Youth United for Change.

 

http://www.wearepcaps.org

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Full Funding Fridays!

Since the first week of school, the Philadelphia Coalition Advocating for Public Schools (PCAPS) has held weekly events for the coalition’s “Full Funding Fridays” campaign to empower teachers and students to demand more funding for public schools. Each Friday for the last five weeks, PCAPS has rallied with teachers from various elementary, middle, and high schools to spread the word about the tough conditions they and their students have been subjected to. The campaign will continue full steam into November, keeping pressure on Governor Corbett, City Council, and Mayor Nutter to fully fund Philadelphia Public Schools.

Check out some pictures taken over the last several weeks below! You can view the rest of the album here.  If you would like to be involved in Full Funding Fridays, visit http://wearepcaps.org/ to find out if a school near you will host a Full Funding Friday action.

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Sixth PCAPS Full Funding Fridays events this morning

Media Advisory

For Immediate Release

Friday, October 18, 2013

Jihad Seifullah

614-390-1105, pcapscoordinator@gmail.com

Jesse Kudler

617-974-3684, jesse@fightforphilly.org

Sixth PCAPS Full Funding Fridays events this morning

Philadelphia Coalition Advocating for Public Schools continues to expand Friday events with rallies at seven schools to keep up pressure for proper funding for education

Philadelphia, PA – Friday morning, the Philadelphia Coalition Advocating for Public Schools (PCAPS) will hold its sixth event as part of the Full Funding Fridays campaign, rallying at seven city schools. Parents and activists will join school staff to rally, hand out signs and pins, and speak about the need for more funding for Philadelphia public schools.  Ralliers will also have complaint forms for parents to fill out about problematic school conditions and flyers to contact elected officials with complaints.  Despite Governor Corbett finally releasing $45 million in federal funds he had cruelly been keeping from Philadelphia education, city schools are still suffering from massive shortfalls.  The 400 staff that will be rehired represent only a fraction of those laid off under the School Reform Commission’s “doomsday budget,” and no nurses will be rehired, even after the tragic and much-publicized death of student Laporshia Massey.

At Heston Elementary, there is no full time counselor and only one Supportive Services Assistant for the entire school. With no money allotted for materials, teachers pay out of pocket for basic supplies.  At Sheppard Elementary, there are only three bi-lingual teachers in a heavily Spanish-speaking community.  Lack of support staff means teachers do lunchroom and playground duty, taking away from instruction.  There is no full-time counselor, and the school has not had a functioning library for ten years.  At Hill-Freedman Middle, there is no full-time counselor or full-time nurse.  There is no extended day program that can enrich student learning and give struggling students extra help.  At Franklin High School, there is only one guidance counselor for 850 students. Special education students are not getting the assistance they need, with caseloads above the legal maximum.  There is inadequate staff to supervise the lunchroom.  At Fell Elementary, classrooms lack basic supplies.  All support staff has been lost, including five student support assistants and a non-teaching assistant.  The school counselor only visits Fell for half a day each week.

Frankford High lost five counselors this year.   The two who remain cannot meet the needs of over 1,400 students.  All secretaries have been laid off except for one.  Frankford used to have 30 non-teaching assistants but now has only 12.  Counselors are doing double-duty helping out in the office.  Frankford also lacks a bilingual secretary.  There is no security staff in the halls and lunchroom.   Spruance Elementary lost two school counselors and 4 office staff, leaving only one counselor and one secretary for more than 1,300 students.  Staff reductions mean there is not enough supervision in the yard, at recess, lunchtime and dismissal.

WHO:

Philadelphia Coalition Advocating for Public Schools (PCAPS) and school staff; PFT President Jerry Jordan

WHAT:

Full Funding Fridays Actions, week five

WHEN:

Friday, October 18, 2013, 7:15 and 7:45am

WHERE:

Heston Elementary: 1621 N. 54th St. 19131  

Ben Franklin High School: 550 N Broad St, 19130

Fell Elementary:  900 West Oregon Ave 19148

Frankford High School: 5000 Oxford Avenue 19124

Hill-Freedman Middle School: 6200 Crittenden St, 19138

Sheppard Elementary: 120 W Cambria St, 19133  

Spruance Elementary: 6401 Horrocks St, 19149

VISUAL:

Speakers, pins, signs, complaint forms, ralliers, parents

 ###

PCAPS is a coalition of students, parents, and teachers with an unwavering commitment to improving Philadelphia’s school system. Members of the coalition include ACTION United, American Federation of Teachers PA, AFL-CIO Central Labor Council Fight For Philly, Jewish Labor Committee, Jobs With Justice, JUNTOS, Media Mobilizing Project, Occupy Philadelphia Labor Work Group, Philadelphians Allied for a Responsible Economy(PHARE), Philadelphia Federation of Teachers, Philadelphia Home and School Council, Philadelphia Student Union, SEIU 32BJ, UNITE HERE, Youth United for Change.

http://www.wearepcaps.org

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Fifth PCAPS Full Funding Fridays events this morning

 

Media Advisory

For Immediate Release

Friday, October 11, 2013

Jihad Seifullah

614-390-1105, pcapscoordinator@gmail.com

Jesse Kudler

617-974-3684, jesse@fightforphilly.org

 

Fifth PCAPS Full Funding Fridays events this morning

Philadelphia Coalition Advocating for Public Schools continues to expand Friday events with rallies at eight schools to keep up pressure for proper funding for education

Philadelphia, PA – Friday morning, the Philadelphia Coalition Advocating for Public Schools (PCAPS) will hold its fifth event as part of the Full Funding Fridays campaign, rallying at eight city schools. Parents and activists will join school staff to rally, hand out signs and pins, and speak about the need for more funding for Philadelphia public schools.  Ralliers will also have complaint forms for parents to fill out about problematic school conditions and flyers to contact elected officials with complaints.

At Jenks Elementary, Philadelphia Federation of Teachers President Jerry Jordan will join teachers, staff, and activists. Jenks recently lost an additional teacher due to “leveling” (changes to staffing after student populations have stabilized for the year), meaning that students at the school will only be in classes that combine multiple grade-levels in one room. Before the year began, the K-4 already lost one full-time teacher, a part-time teacher, its counselor, four noontime aids and two Support Service Assistants.

At Northeast High School, there is only one counselor for nearly 3,000 students. The popular Project Space Research Center (SPARC) program, which has been recognized and praised by NASA, has been left unfunded. There is no librarian. The school district will no longer covers exam costs for Advanced Placement classes in a school where over 60% of the students are from low-income households. 

At Kelly Elementary, a secretary was laid off. Support staff have been pulled from working with children in the classrooms to aid in the office.  The school’s counselor must double as a nurse and also service four classes with severely disabled children, in addition to duties with the general student body.  With major supply shortages, Kelly depends on donations from parents and teachers to keep going.

After surrounding schools closed, Rhodes Elementary went from a middle school to a K-8 school. Despite this new influx of students, Rhodes Elementary has no guidance counselor, no Student Support Assistants, and a school nurse only three days a week. At Willard Elementary, six teachers have been lost, and class sizes have risen as a result. A bi-lingual counselor, a vice principal, and student support aids were also laid off. Willard’s brand new library with new books is closed because there is no librarian. At Girard Elementary, a well‐stocked library sits unused because there is no librarian. Books and materials are unavailable.  Four student support assistants who worked in classrooms have been laid off.  At Mastbaum High School, counseling staff has been cut in half.  This makes it extremely difficult for students get the help they need to get into college or advanced vocational programs.  One secretary was cut, forcing the principal to help out answering phones.  With inadequate levels of school police and support personnel in a six floor building, staff is hard pressed to provide security.  At Sayre Elementary, the school has lost three counselors, two assistant principals, a dean, and all five hallway aides. 100 laptops were stolen this year.  A nurse is available only two days a week. The library is now closed.

WHO:

Philadelphia Coalition Advocating for Public Schools (PCAPS) and school staff

WHAT: Full Funding Fridays Actions, week five
WHEN: Friday, October 11, 2013, 7:15 and 7:45am
WHERE:

A.S. Jenks, 2501 S. 13th St., 7:45am (primary location for press)

and

Sayre High School, 5800 Walnut St., 7:15am

Mastbaum AVT High School, 3116 Frankford Ave., 7:15am

E. Washington Rhodes Elementary School, 2900 W. Clearfield St., 7:45am

Northeast High School, 1601 Cottman Ave., 7:15am

John B Kelly Elementary School, 5116 Pulaski Ave., 7:45am

Stephen Girard Elementary School, 1800 Snyder Ave., 7:30am

Willard Elementary School, 1930 E. Elkhart St., 7:45am

VISUAL: Speakers, pins, signs, complaint forms, ralliers, parents

###

PCAPS is a coalition of students, parents, and teachers with an unwavering commitment to improving Philadelphia’s school system. Members of the coalition include ACTION United, American Federation of Teachers PA, AFL-CIO Central Labor Council Fight For Philly, Jewish Labor Committee, Jobs With Justice, JUNTOS, Media Mobilizing Project, Occupy Philadelphia Labor Work Group, Philadelphians Allied for a Responsible Economy(PHARE), Philadelphia Federation of Teachers, Philadelphia Home and School Council, Philadelphia Student Union, SEIU 32BJ, UNITE HERE, Youth United for Change.

 

http://www.wearepcaps.org

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PCAPS to broaden Full Funding Fridays this morning

Media Advisory

For Immediate Release

October 4, 2013

Jihad Seifullah

614-390-1105, pcapscoordinator@gmail.com

Jesse Kudler

617-974-3684, jesse@fightforphilly.org

 

PCAPS to broaden Full Funding Fridays this morning

Philadelphia Coalition Advocating for Public Schools rallies at seven schools to keep up pressure for proper funding for city schools

 

Philadelphia, PA – Friday morning, the Philadelphia Coalition Advocating for Public Schools (PCAPS) will hold its fourth event as part of the Full Funding Fridays campaign, rallying at seven city schools.  Parents and activists will join school staff to rally, hand out signs and pins, and speak about the need for more funding for Philadelphia public schools.   Ralliers will also have complaint forms for parents to fill out about problematic school conditions and flyers to contact elected officials with complaints. 

 

As school closes its fourth week, reports of problems from massive funding cuts continue.  Many schools are without guidance counselors, complicating college application plans and creating dangerous situations for students seeking emotional help.  Nursing shortages have meant students with injuries, illness, or asthma often have no in-building recourse.

At Kensington High School for the Creative and Performing Arts (CAPA), the school has lost English, History, Dance, and Music teachers that were the key to the school’s mission as a creative and performing arts high school.  As in many schools, both counselors are gone, and a nurse is only on site three days a week.  School safety is jeopardized because of lack of staff. Two weeks ago, a student slit his/her wrist. When a teacher reported the event to the district, the teacher was asked where the (non-existent) counselor was by the very district that had laid counselors off.

At Bartram High School, 23 staff have been lost since last year, including teachers, a librarian, a disciplinarian, and a data specialist.  Despite these major staffing cuts, enrollment is up because of school closings and mergers.  Due to staffing shortages, theft from the school has increased, as have disciplinary problems.

 

Other schools have also struggled with guidance counselor and nursing shortages and over-sized classes.  At Locke Elementary, support for special needs students barely exists.  A student who hurt her arm when no nurse was in the building only found out it was broken after visiting a doctor two days later.  At Thomas Mifflin Elementary, the principal has been unable to secure workbooks for reading and math have been ordered for the schools, although the principal has tried repeatedly.  Olney Elementary had its secretarial staff cut to one. A bilingual secretary has been lost, which creates a major issue in a community with many Spanish speaking families.

 

Last week, a poll from The Pew Charitable Trusts found Philadelphia residents’ approval of the city has steadily decreased since 2009. Larry Eichel, director of Pew’s Philadelphia Research Initiative, has linked these results to the schools crisis.  Mayor Michael Nutter’s approval rating has hit an all-time low of 39 percent, while City Council’s approval rating fell to 30 percent. These results are clearly a reflection of residents’ dissatisfaction with the school funding crisis and the lack of response and support from elected city officials.  According to a previous Pew survey, thirty-one percent of residents blame Corbett and the Republican-controlled state legislature for school funding problems, while thirty-one percent blame Nutter and City Council.  Twenty-one percent blamed school administrators and the state-controlled SRC, but only 11-percent blame unions representing teachers and other workers.  Teachers are working now without a contract.  Still, elected leaders and unelected school reform groups pushed this week for new state legislation to end teacher seniority.

 

WHO:

Philadelphia Coalition Advocating for Public Schools (PCAPS) and school staff

WHAT: Full Funding Fridays Actions
WHEN: Friday, October 4, 2013, 7:15 and 7:45am
WHERE: John Bartram High School, 2401 S. 67th St.,  7:15; Alain Locke Elementary, 4550 Haverford Ave., 7:45;  Franklin Learning Center, 616 N. 15th St.,  7:15; Kensington CAPA, 1901 N. Front St., 7:45; Olney Elementary School, Tabor and Water Sts., 7:45; Lincoln High School, 3201 Ryan Ave. , 7:15; Thomas Mifflin Elementary, 3624 Conrad St., 7:45
VISUAL: Speakers, pins, signs, complaint forms, ralliers, parents

###

PCAPS is a coalition of students, parents, and teachers with an unwavering commitment to improving Philadelphia’s school system.  Members of the coalition include ACTION United, American Federation of Teachers PA,  AFL-CIO Central Labor Council Fight For Philly, Jewish Labor Committee,  Jobs With Justice, JUNTOS, Media Mobilizing Project, Occupy Philadelphia Labor Work Group, Philadelphians Allied for a Responsible Economy(PHARE), Philadelphia Federation of Teachers, Philadelphia Home and School Council, Philadelphia Student Union, SEIU 32BJ, UNITE HERE, Youth United for Change.

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Public school supporters to protest Gov. Corbett at Drexel University Thursday

Media Advisory

For Immediate Release

Thursday, October 3, 2013

Jihad Seifullah
614-390-1105pcapscoordinator@gmail.com

Jesse Kudler

617-974-3684, jesse@fightforphilly.org

 

Public school supporters to protest Gov. Corbett at Drexel University Thursday

Philadelphia Coalition Advocating for Public Schools and others demand governor support public education statewide

Philadelphia, PA – Philadelphia Coalition Advocating for Public Schools (PCAPS) and activists, parents, grandparents, and community members will protest Governor Tom’s Corbett’s appearance in Philadelphia Thursday morning.  Activists will gather at 32nd and Market as the governor joins Drexel President John A. Fry for a dedication ceremony at the new Gerri C. LeBow Hall, the home of Drexel’s College of Business.

 

Fry is also CEO of Drexel e-Learning, Inc., the University’s for-profit subsidiary marketing online Drexel degree programs.  As an education profiteer, is it no surprise that he joined Gov. Corbett on a controversial trade trip to South America in April, joining various Corbett corporate fundraisers.  Fry is also on the board of the Philadelphia School Partnership, a pro-voucher, pro-charter, pro-privatization school reform group that has been instrumental in pushing for cuts to Philadelphia schools.

Since taking office in 2011, Gov. Corbett has expanded tax breaks for corporations while cutting $1 billion from education statewide. His hand-picked School Reform Commission has lost millions to lack of charter school oversight and bad Wall Street deals. And Philadelphia students are suffering.  24 schools have closed, and the School Reform Commission passed its “doomsday” budget, cutting funds for nurses, art, music, librarians, extracurricular activities and counselors. Students are being forced into overcrowded classrooms without enough books or paper. They are being put in danger as they cross through unfamiliar neighborhoods to get to new schools.

Meanwhile, Gov. Corbett is holding $45 million of federal funding hostage, money meant for and desperately needed in Philadelphia public schools.  Corbett is demanding concessions from the teachers union and unspecific “reform” before agreeing to provide more money for students.

Protesters will demand Corbett listen to the voices of thousands of Philadelphians who can’t afford expensive private schools.  The governor must fully fund Philadelphia schools.

WHO: PCAPS and activists, parents, and community members
WHAT: Protest against Gov. Corbett in Philadelphia
WHEN: Thursday, October 3, 2013
WHERE: LeBow Hall, Drexel University, 32nd and Market
VISUAL: Diverse crowd of protesters, colorful signs, speeches

###

PCAPS is a coalition of students, parents, and teachers with an unwavering commitment to improving Philadelphia’s school system. Members of the coalition include ACTION United, American Federation of Teachers PA,  AFL-CIO Central Labor Council Fight For Philly, Jewish Labor Committee,  Jobs With Justice, JUNTOS, Media Mobilizing Project, Occupy Philadelphia Labor Work Group, Philadelphians Allied for a Responsible Economy(PHARE), Philadelphia Federation of Teachers, Philadelphia Home and School Council, Philadelphia Student Union, SEIU 32BJ, UNITE HERE, Youth United for Change.

http://www.wearepcaps.org

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Parents and Community members Picket State Representative Lowery Brown for Co-sponsorship of Anti-teacher legislation

Media Advisory

For Immediate Release

Tuesday, October 1, 2013

Jesse Kudler

617-974-3684, jesse@fightforphilly.org

Craig Robbins

215-917-1701, crobbins@actionunited.org

                                                        

Parents and Community members Picket State Representative Lowery Brown for Co-sponsorship of Anti-teacher legislation

 

Parents and community members from the community groups ACTION United and Fight for Philly will picket the district office of State Representative Vanessa Lowery Brown Tuesday in response to her co-sponsorship of legislation that will strip teachers of their seniority rights.  Introduced Monday with PennCan and the Philadelphia School Partnership, two groups pushing a right-wing education agenda, the ironically-named “Protecting Excellent Teachers Act” would eliminate seniority for public school teachers.  This would erode the rights of teachers unions and ultimately hurt students, as teachers would be encouraged to compete against each other and “teach to the test.”

PSP executive director Mark Gleason has explicitly tied the end of seniority to increased funding for schools, saying it would help Republican Gov. Tom Corbett release $45million in funds currently being held up.  This cynical maneuver positions teachers as bargaining chips rather than lobbying for full funding for schools.

Wanda Logan, ACTION United leader and 190th district resident says, “At a time when we’re lacking basic necessities in our schools- guidance counselors, nurses, librarians, text books and paper- this legislation proposes to attack teachers.  This is about breaking the union. Once they do that, they can break all the rules.”

WHO: Fight for Philly, Action United, parents, and activists
WHAT: Protest Vanessa Lowery Brown’s support for ending teacher seniority
WHEN: Tuesday, October 1, 11:00am.
WHERE: District office of Rep. Vanessa Lowery Brown, 1435 N. 52nd St
VISUAL: Diverse crowd, signs, chants

 

###

Fight for Philly is building a grassroots coalition of residents, community groups, neighborhood associations, faith organizations and labor groups united in the fight for good jobs, corporate accountability and strong communities.

info@fightforphilly.org * (215) 232-3792 * http://fightforphilly.org

ACTION United is a 52,000 member statewide community organization fighting for good and fully funded schools, paid sick days and expanded voting rights.  

 

215-839-3390 * www.actionunited.org * https://www.facebook.com/ActionUnited

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